After merging with EA, BioWare began the most controversial period of the famous game company, known for its quality RPGs.

After Interplay collapsed and franchised Dungeons & Dragons for Atari, BioWare started developing a new game based on this board game. On July 18, 2002 welcomed Neverwinter Nights, an immersive product that was originally intended to be released by Interplay but eventually to Atari.

Neverwinter Nights marks the first time BioWare uses the Aurora engine, an upgrade of Infinity with full 3D rendering capabilities and many other outstanding features. Especially, Neverwinter Nights supports 64 players on the same server because BioWare’s criteria are to design games like an MMO. Of course the game still has a single player, but other players can always jump to play.

The success of Neverwinter Nights has been anticipated. The towering scores from reputable game magazines and sales of more than two million copies in 2007 proved sufficient to attract BioWare’s brainchild. Three expansions called Shadows of Undrentide, Hordes of Underdark and Kingmaker were released within two years. Despite receiving different responses, basically all of them created a mark on the world game map.

2005 marked the first time BioWare created its own immersive world with Jade Empire, an immersive action game set in China. Released by Microsoft Gam Studios for the first Xbox console, Jade Empire is an experience that is quite different from the previous BioWare products not only in context but also in gameplay. But with a score of 89 out of 100 on Metacritic, the adventure called the Jade Empire is still a pride of the company.

And this is when BioWare got into Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, released in 2003 for Xbox and Microsoft Windows. As an immersive game set in 4000 years before the events of the original movie, the game is an impressive experience with a wide array of characters and intriguing storyline. Knights of the Old Republic is considered by many information channels and game experts as one of the best titles ever created. And more than three million copies of the game sold are a small number, paving the way for Star Wars to take a proud step back into the video game world.